Quick Answer: How Are All The DNS Servers Maintained?

Domain Name Servers (DNS) are the Internet’s equivalent of a phone book.

They maintain a directory of domain names and translate them to Internet Protocol (IP) addresses.

Host companies and Internet Service Providers interact with the Central Registry on a regular schedule to get updated DNS information.

Who controls the DNS server?

ICANN² is responsible for the servers for one of the 13 IP addresses and entrusts the operation of the rest to various other organizations. In total, there are 12 organizations held responsible, with VeriSign operating two of them³.

What are the 13 root DNS servers?

The root servers are operated by 12 different organizations:

  • A VeriSign Global Registry Services.
  • B University of Southern California, Information Sciences Institute.
  • C Cogent Communications.
  • D University of Maryland.
  • E NASA Ames Research Center.
  • F Internet Systems Consortium, Inc.
  • G US DoD Network Information Center.

Why don’t we all maintain our own DNS?

Why do we need a Domain Name System? Domain Name System allows users to have the same url or consistent domain name while IP addresses change frequently. We need DNS because without it users would need to keep on checking the IP addresses of others and of themselves to send messages or view sites.

How many DNS servers should I have?

At a minimum, you’ll need two DNS servers for each Internet domain you have. You can have more than two for a domain but usually three is tops unless you have multiple server farms where you would want to distribute the DNS lookup load. It’s a good idea to have at least one of your DNS servers at a separate location.