Question: What Is The Usage Of DNS?

It is mainly used to convert human meaningful names (domain name) to computer meaningful name (IP address) in Internet.

This is because computers can only recognize IP addresses.

It allows you to use internet more easily by allowing you to specify a meaningful name on your web browser instead of using IP address.

What is DNS and why it is used?

DNS stands for Domain Name System. The main function of DNS is to translate domain names into IP Addresses, which computers can understand. It also provides a list of mail servers which accept Emails for each domain name. This record is used to point your domain name to an IP address.

How do DNS work?

How does DNS work?

  • Step 1: Request information.
  • Step 2: Ask the recursive DNS servers.
  • Step 3: Ask the root name servers.
  • Step 4: Ask the TLD name servers.
  • Step 5: Ask the authoritative DNS servers.
  • Step 6: Retrieve the record.
  • Step 7: Receive the answer.

What is the purpose of Domain Name System DNS?

The domain name system (DNS) is a naming database in which internet domain names are located and translated into internet protocol (IP) addresses. The domain name system maps the name people use to locate a website to the IP address that a computer uses to locate a website.

What are the purposes of a DNS and a wins?

DNS means Domain Name System. WINS is generally used for gadgets that are powered by Windows while DNS is usually used for the Domain Name System. The primary purpose of WINS is to make sure that some issues will be resolved such as the NetBIOS name of the available IP addresses.

Is DNS a protocol?

(Although many people think “DNS” stands for “Domain Name Server,” it really stands for “Domain Name System.”) DNS is a protocol within the set of standards for how computers exchange data on the internet and on many private networks, known as the TCP/IP protocol suite.

How many types of DNS are there?

3 types of DNS servers—DNS Resolver, DNS Root Server and Authoritative Name Server. 10 types of common DNS records—including A, AAAA, CNAME, MX and NS.