Quick Answer: What Is The Use Of DNS?

Domain Name Servers (DNS) are the Internet’s equivalent of a phone book.

They maintain a directory of domain names and translate them to Internet Protocol (IP) addresses.

This is necessary because, although domain names are easy for people to remember, computers or machines, access websites based on IP addresses.

How do DNS work?

The Domain Name System (DNS) is the phonebook of the Internet. Web browsers interact through Internet Protocol (IP) addresses. DNS translates domain names to IP addresses so browsers can load Internet resources. Each device connected to the Internet has a unique IP address which other machines use to find the device.

What is DNS Example?

DNS, or the Domain Name System, translates human readable domain names (for example, www.amazon.com) to machine readable IP addresses (for example, 192.0. 2.44).

What is DNS lookup used for?

Use the DNS lookup tool to find the IP address of a certain domain name. The results will include the IP addresses in the DNS records received from the name servers.

Is DNS a protocol?

(Although many people think “DNS” stands for “Domain Name Server,” it really stands for “Domain Name System.”) DNS is a protocol within the set of standards for how computers exchange data on the internet and on many private networks, known as the TCP/IP protocol suite.

What layer is DNS?

In OSI stack terms, DNS runs in parallel to HTTP in the Application Layer (layer 7). DNS is in effect an application that is invoked to help out the HTTP application, and therefore does not sit “below” HTTP in the OSI stack. DNS itself also makes use of UDP and more rarely TCP, both of which in turn use IP.